The other day we made epic sprinkle covered ice cream treats, and discussed some art. What could be better!?

Using the steps mentioned here, we discussed "On The Threshold Of Liberty" by Rene Magritte. 

Rene Magritte, On The Threshold Of Liberty. Photo by Stephen

Rene Magritte, On The Threshold Of Liberty. Photo by Stephen

Below are the interpretations of Stephen (my husband), Andy and Spencer (my sons) and myself.

WHAT DO YOU SEE?

  • A cannon
  • A naked woman
  • The cannon is pointing at the naked woman
  • Trees
  • Windows to an apartment building
  • The grey section looks like magnified grass stalks
  • The upper right section looks like fire
  • The section behind the cannon looks like an air vent
  • The ceiling has a reflection
  • It also has a crack
  • Both the ceiling and floor are grey
  • There's crown molding
  • The canvas is split in two and the cannon is clearly contained on the right
  • The cannon is definitely in the space because of the shadow beneath it

WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THESE FROM YOUR EXPERIENCE?

  • The images are somehow connected
  • The female is objectified, she doesn't have an identity
  • Wood is bumpy
  • The super abstracted image reminds me of a detailed piece of art at Papa Bob's house
  • Starts to become the elements: fire earth air etc...
  • They remind me of portals into different worlds
  • It's sort of like different panels of a comic

WHY WOULD THE ARTIST PUT THIS TOGETHER?

  • This isn't a peaceful piece of art
  • The cannon makes it stressful and it looks like it can turn and hit any of the images in the room
  • the images on the one side of the room look peaceful and natural while the other side is more man made and/or stressful. 
  • The cannon would take on a different meaning if moved to the left side of the canvas. It would look like it's protecting things instead of attacking.
  • I think it's about organic/inorganic
  • I think it's about what human's try to control

These are our interpretations, you may see something different. Oh, and I should mention that when we do this we don't read up about the piece until after we've looked at it.