One of the reasons I started Dartily was to push myself artistically. I want to increase moments of flow, gain new insights, and take my art to the next level.

I watched this video on Creativity and Rock Climbing because Andy competes in it. 

See video here.

In the video, he says that rock climbing helps his creativity because he has an end goal in mind but has to find his way there as he goes. He also says that it "preoccupies your mind while your mind is actually working in the background."

This is pretty accurate to what I heard at a Neuroscience and Creativity lecture where scientist Mark Beeman spoke on the topic of Aha moments of sudden insight.

There he mentioned that when you feel like you reached a dead end you need to break yourself apart from the problem, because your unconscious is processing.

In my notes from his lecture it also says:

  • Aha moments always work
  • you always remember them
  • they're rewarding and make you feel good
  • which increases your confidence and then also your persistence

 He just released this book on the subject:

The other author John Kounios gave a lecture on the subject that you can see here. In it he mentions that in order to have an Aha moment you need to be in a prepared state. Meaning introspective --not distracted by things around you-- and in a calm positive mood. This will better prepare you to solve a problem with an Aha moment that is spontaneous and unconscious as opposed to the other way to solve a problem which is a linear analytic method.

The science behind it all shows that it's the right anterior superior temporal gyrus that is activated at the Aha moment. That's the part of the brain above the right ear.

In the video he also shows a chart proving that Aha moments are always correct! He also explains that for people who are less experienced they can actually become more creative when they are literally told "Be more creative" That doesn't work for experts though. For experts Aha moments produce ideas to problems no one knew existed. 

I find the science behind artistic experiences fascinating.

Oh, and Eureka is totally going to be the name of my next dog!