Using the three steps to reading art mentioned here we discussed this piece by D*Face.

Below are the interpretations of Stephen (my husband), Andy and Spencer (my sons) and myself.

WHAT DO YOU SEE?

  • it looks like a ginormous rain drop
  • the drawing looks like a face
  • wait, it's a skateboarder
  • whoa cool!
  • that's amazing!
  • it's leaving his tracks
  • wheels could get slippery if the paint is on the wheels
  • Oh! it's spray paint attached to the bottom of the board
  • that's so smart
  • smooth lines
  • they have such control of it, which is amazing
  • so fun!
  • the lines are very particular
  • this is pretty great
  • I love the color choices
  • cool to see how consistent their movements are
  • there are lines that they always follow because the pool lends itself well to it
  • I love it
  • awesome design
  • love to see it in color
  • lines are so fluid

WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THESE FROM YOUR EXPERIENCE?

  • very pollock-like with the seemingly messy painting...but this is patterned and controlled
  • painting at the bottom of pools has been done by artists before: Picasso and Hockney
  • it's not what would be expected
  • it's like a spirograph
  • I'd love to see the lines move as the water moves
  • very cool video definitely need to see the performance element of the piece

WHY DID THE ARTIST PUT THIS ALL TOGETHER?

  • it's displaying our tracks as people
  • there's a play and engineering element to this too
  • couldn't have been done in a halfpipe, it had to be done in a swimming pool because the pool adds tons of new elements to the concept since skateboarding in pools is a part of skateboarding history
  •  it's cool that skateboarding and painting both have a history with pools
  • there's a juxtaposition between graffiti and property damage with skateboarding. then doing this on purpose
  • it's surprising and makes me think of skateboards differently
  • it's vandalism turned art

These are our interpretations, you may see something different. Oh, and I should mention that when we do this we don't read up about the piece until after we've looked at it.